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Get Informed | Dissolved Gasses

What are Dissolved Gasses? 

There are a number of dissolved gases in water that may be a problem or concern. In general, these gases do not have a specific drinking water standard. In this section we will discuss four gases: carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, methane, and radon.

Carbon Dioxide (City Water, Well Water, and Spring Water) - Levels of carbon dioxide may be high within a water source for a number of reasons which include, a change in temperature that causes the dissolved gas to just start coming out of solution or bacterial regrowth in the distribution system increasing the level of carbon dioxide in the water. Note: The presence of carbon dioxide in the water does not mean the water has bacteria. As the carbon dioxide comes out of solution, the pH of the water will increase. Typically, the water may appear "milky" and if you allow a glass of water to set undisturbed on the counter, the water clears in a few minutes from the bottom up. If it takes over 2 minutes for the gas and water to separate and if this is associated with an increase in the pH of the water the gas may be carbon dioxide.

Hydrogen Sulfide (Well Water and Spring Water; rare in City Water) - A hydrogen sulfide or rotten-egg smell can be associated with the presence of hydrogen sulfide gas. This gas may be present because the water is coming from a deep water-bearing zone, or a portion of a distribution system that is very low in or has no oxygen, which may suggest that a disease-causing agent or nuisance bacteria may be present. If this condition is only in the hot water, this could be because of the type of anode rod in the water heater.

Sulfur (Well Water and Spring Water) - The water has an odor like the smell from mercaptans (sulfur compounds) that have been added to natural gas or propane. We have worked on a number of projects where a leaky propane or natural gas line has caused local groundwater sources to have a sulfur odor.

Methane (Well Water and Spring Water) - this gas is typically associated with wetlands, bogs, landfills, coal-producing formations, natural saline seeps, sources of natural gas like the Marcellus Shale, oil fields, some shallower glacial deposits, and natural gas storage areas. Methane is a colorless, odorless gas that is lighter than air. Natural gas is mostly methane (70 – 90 % CH₄), carbon dioxide (0 to 8 % CO₂), plus traces of other gases such as ethane (C₂H₆), propane (C₃H₈), butane (C₄H₁₀), and hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) as well as small amounts of helium. Methane is not considered toxic, but it is an asphyxiant at a concentration of over 50 percent in air (it displaces oxygen). Therefore, the primary risks for methane would be asphyxiation in a confined or poorly-vented area; it is also a potential explosion hazard. As a safety measure, the natural gas industry adds mercaptans to the produced methane gas that enters the pipeline and your home. The mercaptans produce a very pungent odor so that gas leaks will be noticed, but unprocessed methane gas tends to have NO ODOR. It is critical to note that some unprocessed methane gas may contain long chain hydrocarbon molecules that may have an odor. You may suspect the presence of methane gas in your water if you hear a “gurgling noise”, sputtering at the tap, the water has a lot of gas bubbles, is effervescent or fizzy. Typically, the gas comes out of solution very quickly.

Radon Gas (Well Water) - Radon is a gas produced by the radioactive decay of the element radium. Radioactive decay is a natural, spontaneous process in which an atom of one element decays or breaks down to form another element by losing atomic particles (protons, neutrons, or electrons). Radon gas in water has no odor or color and does not produce any gas bubbles or fizz; it is detectable only through its radioactivity.

How Do Dissolved Gases become a problem?

In most cases, these gases create a nuisance, but in the case of Radon or Hydrogen Sulfide, there may be a health-related issue, Methane is flammable and, in large quantities, can lead to asphyxiation. High levels of carbon dioxide in the water can cause aesthetic issues and reduce the pH of the water. Hydrogen sulfide may be associated with corrosion of fixtures and is flammable and poisonous. Usually it is not a health risk at concentrations present in household water, except in very high concentrations. While such concentrations are rare, hydrogen sulfide's presence in drinking water, when released in confined areas, has been known to cause nausea, illness and, in extreme cases, death.

What are the Health Risks for Dissolved Gasses?

Dissolved carbon dioxide makes the water more acidic and corrosive which leads to higher concentrations of metals in the water. Most of the other problems with dissolved gasses are that they don’t stay dissolved in the water but become part of indoor air; showers and washing machines are especially efficient at getting dissolved gasses out of water and into the air. Radon in air is associated with lung cancer. Hydrogen sulfide can irritate the throat tissue so much that the throat swells shut, causing asphyxiation.  Methane and carbon dioxide can also cause asphyxiation but only if present in large enough quantities to displace oxygen. Methane is flammable and can even be an explosion hazard.

What are the Standards for Dissolved Gasses?

Methane - The US Department of the Interior, Office of Surface Mining, suggests that when the level of methane gas in the water is less than 10 mg/L it is safe, but monitoring is required at 10 to 28 mg/L, and immediate action is needed above 28 mg/L. At a level of 28 mg/L, the water is fully saturated with methane and it is likely that any air space in the well is at or approaching the LEL. The air and out-gassing methane, not the water, is now flammable.

Radon - The United States Environmental Protection Agency is reportedly prepared to set a maximum contaminant Level of 300 to 4,000 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) standard for radon in drinking water. "At high levels (i.e. among mine workers) radon is a known human carcinogen. There is, however, epidemiological evidence that low levels present no increased cancer risk" (Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Dec. 1994). Note that while radon in air is associated with lung cancer, radon in water is not associated with any kind of cancer.

There are Secondary Drinking Water Standards related to the presence of Odor (Threshold Odor Number) and Color.

Get Tested | Dissolved Gasses

Testing for dissolved gases can be difficult and, in most cases, specialized sampling equipment and field preservation is required, but you can see, hear, and smell problems that may be associated with a dissolved gas. Your senses will not help you detect radon in water, but if you have a Radon level in your home approaching or over 4 pCi/L, we recommend testing your well water for radon. Note, however, that permissible levels of radon in water are much higher than the standard for radon in air.

Level 1 | Observational Self-Testing

Level 1 Testing is done with simple observations that an individual can make with their own senses such as sight, smell, and taste. These observations can be readily apparent or can be observed as they change over time. In addition, accessible related information about the home can also be used to narrow down the cause of your water issues.

Observations for Dissolved Gases

Here are some clues to problems you may be able to identify with your eyes, ears, and nose:

  • If your water is fizzy or very gaseous, with no odor, and the gas outgasses (leaves the water) very quickly, it is likely the problem is methane. Methane can also cause a water hammer in the pipes; but so can ordinary air.
  • If the water appears milky, but the water clears from the bottom up in a few minutes and there is no odor, the issue may be carbon dioxide. If you monitor the pH of the water, it will likely increase as the carbon dioxide leaves the water.
  • If the water has a Sulfur or rotten-egg smell in both the hot and cold water, the problem is likely Hydrogen Sulfide. If if the smell is only in the hot water, it could be the magnesium rod in the electric water heater.
  • If you are on a well, it may be advisable to hire a well driller to inspect the well and distribution system; the pump may be "sucking" air (the water level in the well has fallen below the pump intake) or the pressure tank may have a problem.
Level 1 | Self-Test Web App
To do a quick and easy self diagnosis of your water, click the button below.
Launch

Level 2 | Do-It-Yourself Testing

Level 2 Testing is Do-It-Yourself testing that can be done in your own home using a Testing Kit. After you’ve done Level 1 Testing, Level 2 Testing can confirm if your observations are correct. If your test results reveal the presence of a contaminant that is cause for concern, you can either proceed to determine the best treatment (see below) or continue to Level 3 Testing.

Notes on Level 2 Testing for Dissolved Gases

There are a number of field testing kits that can test for Hydrogen Sulfide gas and carbon dioxide, but there are no accurate and affordable field testing kits for methane or radon. If you suspect a methane issue with your water and you are in an area with natural gas development or pipelines, we recommend that you contact your local state department of health or state department of environmental protection. If your concern is radon, we recommend that you get a long-term Radon-in-air test and get your water tested for radon-in-water.

Recommended Level 2 Tests
National Testing LabsProblem Check (Iron and IRB)

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Biological Odors / CO2 / Sulfur-Like Odors</div>

View
National Testing LabsRadon in Water

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Radon Concerns</div>

View
Tap ScoreMold and Fungus

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Musty, Foul Odors</div>

View
Tap ScoreTotal Microbiological Test

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Sewage Odors</div>

View
Crystal QuestUltraviolet Water Sterilizer System, 6-12 GPM

<div class="product-note in-L6-color-taste-odor">Note: Requires a prefiltration system</div>

View
Crystal QuestGAC Carbon Commercial Water Filter System

<div class="product-note in-L6-benzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-chloroform-trichloromethane">Note: If the concentration is < 0.080 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-ethylbenzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-methylene-chloride-dichloromethane-dcm">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-mtbe-methyl-tert-butyl-ether">Note: If the concentration is < 0.07 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-tetrachloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-trichloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.004 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-toluene">Note: If the concentration is less than 0.8 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-xylenes">Note: If the concentration is < 1 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-atrazine">Note: If the concentration is < 0.001 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-alachlor">Note: If the concentration is < 0.002 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-glyphosate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.7 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-2-4-d">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bis-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.006 mg/L (POE Device System Component</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bromate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.01 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L4-methyl-tertiary">Note: Concentrations < 40 ppb</div>

View
AmazonRadiation Water Filtration Straw® up to 25 gallons

<div class="product-note in-L6-beta-particles">Note: BackPack/ Emergency Use</div>

View
Recommended Products
National Testing LabsL3-NATE-P-1 | Problem Check (Iron and IRB)

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Biological Odors / CO2 / Sulfur-Like Odors</div>

View
National Testing LabsL3-NATE-R-1 | Radon in Water

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Radon Concerns</div>

View
Tap ScoreL3-TASC-M-02 | Mold and Fungus

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Musty, Foul Odors</div>

View
Tap ScoreL3-TASC-T-02 | Total Microbiological Test

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Sewage Odors</div>

View
Crystal QuestLT-CRYS-U-02 | Ultraviolet Water Sterilizer System, 6-12 GPM

<div class="product-note in-L6-color-taste-odor">Note: Requires a prefiltration system</div>

View
Crystal QuestLT-CRYS-G-01 | GAC Carbon Commercial Water Filter System

<div class="product-note in-L6-benzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-chloroform-trichloromethane">Note: If the concentration is < 0.080 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-ethylbenzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-methylene-chloride-dichloromethane-dcm">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-mtbe-methyl-tert-butyl-ether">Note: If the concentration is < 0.07 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-tetrachloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-trichloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.004 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-toluene">Note: If the concentration is less than 0.8 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-xylenes">Note: If the concentration is < 1 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-atrazine">Note: If the concentration is < 0.001 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-alachlor">Note: If the concentration is < 0.002 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-glyphosate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.7 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-2-4-d">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bis-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.006 mg/L (POE Device System Component</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bromate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.01 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L4-methyl-tertiary">Note: Concentrations < 40 ppb</div>

View
AmazonST-AMAZ-R-01 | Radiation Water Filtration Straw® up to 25 gallons

<div class="product-note in-L6-beta-particles">Note: BackPack/ Emergency Use</div>

View

Level 3 | Informational Testing

Level 3 Testing is done through an accredited Water Testing Laboratory. With Level 3 Testing, you can order a testing kit that is used to prepare your sample and submit it to the lab. By utilizing a lab, you have the assurance that a certified water expert had analyzed your water sample. If your test results reveal the presence of a contaminant that is cause for concern, you can either proceed to determine the best treatment options (see below) or continue to Level 4 Testing - Certified Testing.

Notes on Level 3 Testing for Dissolved Gases

For informational water testing, it is difficult to test for dissolved gases in water because the gas most likely will out-gas or come out of solution after sampling. In some cases, the gas is one of the symptoms and not really the problem. Elevated levels of carbon dioxide may be related to the presence of "Bacteria, fungi, mold" or Nuisance Bacteria or petrochemicals in the water. Sulfur odors could mean an issue with the water heater or the presence of Iron/Manganese and/or Sulfate-reducing Bacteria or waterborne pathogens. Methane may be naturally occurring or associated with Methane Gas migration from a natural gas or oil drilling or distribution network. If you are looking for specific testing for methane, it is likely you need to conduct Level 4 testing.

Recommended Level 3 Tests
National Testing LabsProblem Check (Iron and IRB)

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Biological Odors / CO2 / Sulfur-Like Odors</div>

View
National Testing LabsRadon in Water

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Radon Concerns</div>

View
Tap ScoreMold and Fungus

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Musty, Foul Odors</div>

View
Tap ScoreTotal Microbiological Test

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Sewage Odors</div>

View
Crystal QuestUltraviolet Water Sterilizer System, 6-12 GPM

<div class="product-note in-L6-color-taste-odor">Note: Requires a prefiltration system</div>

View
Crystal QuestGAC Carbon Commercial Water Filter System

<div class="product-note in-L6-benzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-chloroform-trichloromethane">Note: If the concentration is < 0.080 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-ethylbenzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-methylene-chloride-dichloromethane-dcm">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-mtbe-methyl-tert-butyl-ether">Note: If the concentration is < 0.07 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-tetrachloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-trichloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.004 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-toluene">Note: If the concentration is less than 0.8 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-xylenes">Note: If the concentration is < 1 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-atrazine">Note: If the concentration is < 0.001 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-alachlor">Note: If the concentration is < 0.002 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-glyphosate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.7 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-2-4-d">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bis-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.006 mg/L (POE Device System Component</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bromate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.01 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L4-methyl-tertiary">Note: Concentrations < 40 ppb</div>

View
AmazonRadiation Water Filtration Straw® up to 25 gallons

<div class="product-note in-L6-beta-particles">Note: BackPack/ Emergency Use</div>

View

Level 4 | Certified Testing

A Level 4 Certified Test Test uses chain-of-custody with a water professional coming to your home to prepare the water sample and then works with an accredited laboratory in order to certify your test results. This type of testing not only gives you the highest level of assurance in the accuracy of your test results, but can also be used as a document in legal cases. For Baseline Testing, we recommend that you use Certified Testing.

Notes on Level 4 Testing for Dissolved Gases

If you are considering certified testing, it is critical to understand the potential causes for the problem. We strongly recommend that you complete the diagnostic assessment and, if present, the hazard that may be contributing to this problem. Because of the nature of the problem, it will likely be necessary to conduct a field assessment as part of the certified testing. If you need assistance with developing a sampling and testing program to assist with your specific issues, please contact our team.

Get Treatment | Dissolved Gasses

Once the cause has been identified, it is normally possible to treat water for issues with dissolved gases. The systems may include an Aeration system to force the gases out of the solution. This type of Aeration system is typically used for carbon dioxide, Methane, sulfur gas, and Radon. In some cases, the aeration approach uses hydrogen peroxide or ozone to help to disinfect the water and this is typically used when a Microbiological agent or Hydrogen Sulfide gas is part of the problem. In the case of sulfur gas, there are situations where the installation of a Carbon Filtration system will address the problem.

If you believe the problem is related to "landfill gas or natural gas migration," it is critical that you work with a professional and contact your local health department or department of environmental protection.

Short-Term Treatment

Depending on the nature and concentration of the gas and water source, it may be possible to modify the system to reduce the problem. If the source is city water and the problem is carbon dioxide and sulfur gas, it may be advisable to encourage the city to flush the main and conduct a shock-disinfection of the piping in your home and to check the piping in the home for backflow issues. If the source of water is a well and the problem is carbon dioxide, Methane, or Radon, it may be possible to vent the well, install a gas shroud around the pump, raise the pump intake, install a dual flow control valve, seal a portion of the well, and to Shock-Disinfect and clean the well to control the Bacterial population. In most cases, it will be necessary to conduct some screening tests, seek advice from a local professional, modify the source, and install a custom approach or modification.

Recommended Short-Term Treatments

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Biological Odors / CO2 / Sulfur-Like Odors</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Radon Concerns</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Musty, Foul Odors</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Sewage Odors</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-color-taste-odor">Note: Requires a prefiltration system</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-benzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-chloroform-trichloromethane">Note: If the concentration is < 0.080 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-ethylbenzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-methylene-chloride-dichloromethane-dcm">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-mtbe-methyl-tert-butyl-ether">Note: If the concentration is < 0.07 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-tetrachloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-trichloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.004 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-toluene">Note: If the concentration is less than 0.8 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-xylenes">Note: If the concentration is < 1 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-atrazine">Note: If the concentration is < 0.001 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-alachlor">Note: If the concentration is < 0.002 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-glyphosate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.7 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-2-4-d">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bis-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.006 mg/L (POE Device System Component</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bromate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.01 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L4-methyl-tertiary">Note: Concentrations < 40 ppb</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-beta-particles">Note: BackPack/ Emergency Use</div>

View

Long-Term Treatment

In the long term, the solution will most likely include a combination of system modification, Shock-Disinfection and purging, and the installation of a venting or oxidizing filtration system that may or may not include granular-activated-carbon. If the cause is related to the presence of a landfill, petrochemical related activities, or waste disposal, it is likely that some modification to those activities will be required or a new source of potable water would need to be developed. In most cases, it will be necessary to conduct some screening tests, seek advice from a local professional, modify the source, and install a custom approach or modification.

Recommended Long-Term Treatments

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Biological Odors / CO2 / Sulfur-Like Odors</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Radon Concerns</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Musty, Foul Odors</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-dissolved-gasses">Note: For Carbon Dioxide, Sewage Odors</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-color-taste-odor">Note: Requires a prefiltration system</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-benzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-chloroform-trichloromethane">Note: If the concentration is < 0.080 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-ethylbenzene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-methylene-chloride-dichloromethane-dcm">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-mtbe-methyl-tert-butyl-ether">Note: If the concentration is < 0.07 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-tetrachloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.005 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-trichloroethylene">Note: If the concentration is < 0.004 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-toluene">Note: If the concentration is less than 0.8 mg/L</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-xylenes">Note: If the concentration is < 1 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-atrazine">Note: If the concentration is < 0.001 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-alachlor">Note: If the concentration is < 0.002 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-glyphosate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.7 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-2-4-d">Note: If the concentration is < 0.03 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bis-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.006 mg/L (POE Device System Component</div>
<div class="product-note in-L6-bromate">Note: If the concentration is < 0.01 mg/L (POE Device System Component)</div>
<div class="product-note in-L4-methyl-tertiary">Note: Concentrations < 40 ppb</div>

View

<div class="product-note in-L6-beta-particles">Note: BackPack/ Emergency Use</div>

View
Contact a KnowYourH2O Recommended Professional

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